Shoelaces, or shoestrings as they are also called, are one of the oldest clothing items in history. Of course we don’t have the name of their inventor or the time they first came around, as ancient laces were made out of fabrics such as leather that are obviously perishable. The oldest shoelaces we have are from 3500 BC.

Nowadays, shoelaces are made out of synthetic fibers. Synthetic fibers are more resistant, more slippery, have a less rougher appearance than natural fibers and endure moisture better.  Firefighters even wear fire-resistant shoelaces.

 

Straight European lacing

Straight European lacing

 

Shoe lacing is the process of running the shoelaces through the holes, eyelets, loops, or hooks of the shoe.

Be prepared,we are going to blow your mind! There are almost two trillion ways to lace a shoe with six pairs of eyelets. Classic lacing techniques, such as the simple technique or the criss-cross lacing are best suited for formal outfits.

 

Criss-cross lacing

Criss-cross lacing

 

But, if you want to express your personality through laces, you should do it while wearing sneakers or less formal shoes! This will definitely add more visual interest to your outfit and give it more of a personal note.

The length of a shoelace can be determined by the number of holes the shoe has. Of course, this is not the only factor that counts, the technique and the type of lace are also important factors. However, we can offer a rough guide that might come in handy, presenting the connection between the number of holes a shoe has and the length of the lace. You can download it here, without leaving the website.

Coming up, we have added, besides the two classic lacing techniques another 14 visual guides to lacing your shoes. These diagrams have been elaborated by Ian Fieggen, who owns a fantastic website on shoelaces. You can see it at www.fieggen.com and see step-by-step tutorials for each type of lacing technique.

You can use them as inspiration. And, don’t forget, if it doesn’t work out from the first time, you can try again and again. Who knows, maybe you’ll find a new way and make it into history. Here are some great ways to tie your laces:

 

Roman lacing

Roman lacing

 

Riding boot lacing

Riding boot lacing

 

Loop Back lacing

Loop Back lacing

 

Left-right lacing

Left-right lacing

 

Ladder lacing

Ladder lacing

 

Knotted lacing

Knotted lacing

 

Hexagram lacing

Hexagram lacing

 

Hash lacing

Hash lacing

 

Gap lacing

Gap lacing

 

Double cross lacing

Double cross lacing

 

Bow tie lacing

Bow tie lacing

 

Train Track lacing

Train Track lacing

 

Straight Bar lacing

Straight Bar lacing

 

Segmented lacing

Segmented lacing

 

 

 

 

Fraquoh and Franchomme

 

 

 

 

 

P.S. What technique do you usually use? Would you try a new technique? Share your thoughts below!